Editorial Note: That Guy: the Legacy of Dub Taylor was never released beyond its screening in Augusta, Georgia, but this series of entries shows the thought process that went into working on my first film.

As we do periodically get emails about this topic, it is not available to the public.

James Kicklighter
Making That Guy: the Legacy of Dub Taylor, James Kicklighter

Welcome to That Guy: The Legacy of Dub Taylor. You might be wondering who the heck Dub Taylor is and why the heck anyone might want to make a feature length documentary about him.

Well, for starters, he's been in over 500 film and television shows over the course of his career, which spanned from Frank Capra's classic, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" all the way up until "Maverick." That's from the late 1930's to the early 1990's. Impressive, eh?

But somehow, people overlook the contributions that these small character actors make to films and television series. These people are the faces and small performances that you remember, though. Dub is that guy that everyone knows by face, but not by name.

When Mark Stokes (the director, you'll be hearing from him soon) approached me with producing and serving as Assistant Director on the project, I didn't know his name, and I didn't have a clue what Dub Taylor had done to contribute to American Cinema.

Hopefully over the next few months as we head towards the premiere on April 14, 2007, you'll get to have a little bit of a clue at what he's done and what we've been doing all over the country.

With that said, welcome to the filmmaker's blog for That Guy: The Legacy of Dub Taylor. Everyone who has been involved will be posting their thoughts over the next few months, and we look forward to reading (and responding) to your comments in these blogs.

Best,
James Kicklighter
Assistant Director/Executive Producer